Helpline: 0800 917 0222
 

Latest

Home > Latest > Blog > The Experience Of Living In A Nursing Home1

Filed in:

Blog


29-Jun-2018

 

The Experience of Living in a Nursing Home

Learning from complaints and concerns is key to service improvement. This week Richard Dixon, Complaints Services Manager for the PCC, explains why this is particularly important for people who are cared for in nursing homes.

On Tuesday the Patient and Client Council  launched a report called ‘The Experience of Living in a Nursing Home’.  It describes the experiences of people whom we have supported to make a complaint about care their family member received in a nursing home.  The main areas of concern related to medication, staffing levels and personal care.

When a person is admitted to a nursing home they rightly expect to be treated with care, compassion and dignity and in the majority of homes across Northern Ireland they receive exactly that.  Residents of nursing homes rarely ever complain themselves, issues around treatment and care are almost always raised by concerned family members or friends.  We hear that sometimes families wait until after their loved one has passed away to complain for fear that care will suffer as a result.  Furthermore we are aware that people are sometimes reluctant to complain because they worry their family member will be asked to leave the home, simply for raising a concern.

People also told us that they do not have faith in the way that homes investigate complaints.

The complaints process within nursing homes must to be more open and transparent.  Staff in care facilities need to foster a culture of openness to complaints and to use issues raised as a basis for learning and improvement.  People must feel confident that when they make a complaint they will be listened to, the complaint will be documented properly, investigated impartially and appropriate action taken.

Earlier this week we met with key decision makers from across Health and Social Care to highlight the findings of our report and discuss what action needs to be taken going forward.  You can read a copy of the report using the following link: http://bit.ly/2KrxvuB

Do you have a family member or friend in a nursing home?  Do you feel confident that you could raise a concern, if you had one?  Do you have an example of best practice?  Tell us in the comments section below.

Remember, if you have a complaint or concern about the treatment and care of a loved one in a nursing home can contact the Patient and Client Council for confidential advice and support by calling 0800 917 0222 or emailing: complaints.pcc@hscni.net.

 
 
 

Have your say ...

Use this form to submit your comments about this news item.

Please note: your name will appear alongside any comments you submit. Your email address will not be shown publicly. To find out how the Patient and Client Council (PCC) manage your personal data, please refer to our Privacy Policy.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Enter the CAPTCHA characters shown above. All uppercase. No spaces.
 
 
 
 

What happens next?

Your comments will be sent to an administrator for approval before being added to the website. Your email address is for our records only and will not be shown publicly. Please fill in all the fields marked *

 
 

Previous comments ...

DEAN RUSSELL 02-Jul-2018 at 14:21 hrs

HELLO. I PREVIOUSLY HAD A RELATIVE IN A NURSING HOME AND I FELT THAT THE MANAGER WASN'T ACCESSIBLE ENOUGH TO RAISE CONCERNS WITH HER. IT'S ALSO NOT CLEAR WHO RELATIVES SHOULD CONTACT OUTSIDE THE NURSING HOME ABOUT CONCERNS THAT THEY WISH TO RAISE ABOUT NURSING HOME SAFETY, FOR INSTANCE. PERHAPS A COMMENTS/COMPLAINTS FORM COULD BE MADE EASILY AVAILABLE IN ALL NURSING HOMES WITH THE OPTION TO SEND IT ANONYMOUSLY TO THE PCC. REGARDS.

 
 

Eamon Duffy 30-Jun-2018 at 14:22 hrs

Wishful thinking. ? Our health setvicr will remain iinadequate. How many disasters will happen before thimgs change. How many of the 92 recommendations from O Hara report have been implemented?
To date none.? What bits of Lynch
Report have been taken on board?

 
 

A Gamble 30-Jun-2018 at 11:30 hrs

I had a horrendous experience for 4 years when I complained in writing to a privately owned nursing home (NOT Dunmurry Manor). There were 9 managers employed in the home during the time my loved one was there. It was closed to new admissions during that time because of the problems identified by RQIA.
I complained to TOP MANAGEMENT in the nursing home group, TOP LEVEL government and public officials, RQIA, nursing and midwifery council, etc. in an effort to change the levels of care (food, laundry, cleanliness, security etc. for my loved one and all the residents. Unfortunately I did not have any whistleblowers to confirm the difficulties, and some other relatives were afraid to complain because they feared their loved ones would suffer. Top management in the nursing home group tried to bully me into silence by threatening to terminate my loved one's contract.
I was lucky to get support for my complaints through PCC top management because I felt totally alone until it became my Advocate. At one stage Management in this nursing home group cancelled meetings, and refused to meet with senior management in a Health Trust, my Advocate, and of course me. THE PROBLEM WITH 100% OF NURSING HOMES IS THAT THEY ARE PRIVATELY OWNED THEREFORE THEY DO NOT APPEAR TO BE ACCOUNTABLE PARTICULARLY TO THOSE WHO ARE PAYING THEM. In most cases they are funded by our public money, plus pensions and top up fees paid by the relatives of our loved ones, from approximate levels of £700+ a week. In a recent document produced by an Expert Panel, commissioned by the Department of Health, entitled 'power to people' the recommendation was that there should be a large mix of statutory nursing care, as well as some private nursing homes provided for those who wish to pay for their care. Statutory provision is generally much better in my view, mostly because they are trained in the care of older people. IN MY VIEW PRIVATISATION DOESN'T WORK BECAUSE OF THE ELEMENT OF PROFIT INVOLVED.
Thanks to the Commissioner for Older People and now This Report, the Department of Health is now producing recommendations to change this very unsatisfactory state of affairs for vulnerable older people. Unfortunately too late for my loved one. Don't forget we are all getting older and may some day be needing a nursing home.

 
 

charlie lynn 29-Jun-2018 at 18:23 hrs

Just to say this was very interesting reading after what we have been hearing on the news recently. God rest my Mother I can still
remember her saying that old age was nothing to look forward to.
Charlie Lynn.